Chester-le-Street Heritage Group

                 The Hermitage Residents.


People in Residence in the 1891 Census


Lindsay WOOD   Head   Magistrate & Mining Engineer
Emma B. WOOD   Wife
Arthur N. L.WOOD  Son
Maud L. WOOD   Daughter
Henry L. WOOD   son
Elsie L.  WOOD   Daughter
Collinwood L. WOOD  Son
Robert L. WOOD   Son
Maria G. SMITH   Sister in Law
Amhurst G. BYGE  Visitor    Fellow and lecturer in coal mining
Edith L.S. BYGE   Niece

Evelyn M.S. BYGE  Grand Niece

Edith C.S. BYGE   Grand Niece
Deny S. BYGE   Visitor     Electric Trainee


 Sir Lindsay Wood


Born in 1834 at Killingworth Hall, Northumberland, he was the youngest son of Nicholas Wood, colliery owner and engineer who worked alongside George Stephenson during the early years of locomotive development as well as experimenting with a miners’ safety lamp.


He was educated at Kepier Grammar School, Houghton-le-Spring and Kings College ,London. He served an apprenticeship as a mining engineer while working at the Hetton Collieries owned by the Hetton Coal Company. His father was manager of the Hetton Collieries and in 1858 Lindsay was appointed viewer (manager) of the North Hetton Colliery (Moorsley Pit). Shortly afterwards he became assistant to his father as manager of Hetton Collieries and when his father died in 1866 he became Managing Director of the Hetton Collieries which comprised the Lyons Colliery, Moorsley Colliery, the Hazard Pit as well as Eppleton and Elemore Collieries. He continued in this position until the company was sold in 1911 to Lord Joicey’s company.


Lindsay Wood was married in 1873 to Emma Barrett of Heighington Hall near Darlington. They initially lived at Hetton Hall but moved to The Hermitage at Chester-le-Street. They had four sons and two daughters the eldest son being Mr. Arthur, Nicholas Lindsay Wood born in 1875. Mr Wood, like his father became a mining engineer and was also a captain in The Northumberland Artillery, a territorial regiment. In 1891 Mrs Emma Wood died suddenly in the late spring at the Hermitage, a great loss to the family.


BY the 1870s Lindsay Wood was a managing partner in the North Hetton Coal Company as well as the Harton Coal Company. He was also serving as Director on the Boards of a number of companies including John Bowes and Partners who owned collieries in the Gateshead area, the Netherton Coal Company in Northumberland, The Newcastle Electric Supply Company, Hendon paper Mills and the Durham Collieries Electric Supply Company.


He actively took an interest like his father in the safety in mines and served on a number of Royal Commissions particularly “Accidents in Mines” which ran from 1870 until 1886. He became President of the North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers in 1875 and this lasted for three years.


Lindsay Wood had a good working relationship with both coal owners and miners’ leaders and was chairman of the Durham Coalowners’ Association for many years as well as chairman of the Durham Colliery Owners’ Mutual Protection Association. He was instrumental in carrying out reforms in education among the Durham villages where his pits were situated and before the Education Act of 1870 he had already made provisions for schools in many of the villages.

He was a Justice of the Peace and Deputy-lieutenant of the County. He became Sheriff in 1889 and was made a baronet for his public service in 1897.


He took an active interest in his family who all did well with their education and social positions. In his later life he took a more active interest in politics albeit at only a County level with various Conservative Associations. He continued to live at the Hermitage for more than 30 years until his death in 1920.

Sir Lindsay Wood Bart.

Obituary

Sir Lindsay Wood

1920, September 23rd


Sir Lindsay Wood, first baronet, for over 40 years president of the Durham Coalowners' Association, died yesterday at the Hermitage, Chester-le-Street, at the age of 86.

Sir Lindsay Wood came of a family which has held a leading place in the history of the Durham and Northumberland coal trade for nearly a century. His father, Nicholas Wood, was colliery viewer at Killingworth in 1819, when George Stephenson, who was enginewright at the same pit, apprenticed his son Robert to him. The Wood Memorial Hall at Newcastle-on-Tyne is a reminder of the esteem in which Nicholas Wood was held by all classes in the North of England at his death in 1866. Of his four sons, who all made names for themselves in the coal industry, Sir Lindsay Wood was the youngest and last survivor. He was born at Killingworth Hall in 1834, and educated at the Royal Kepier Grammar School, Houghton-le-Spring, and King's College, London. After serving his apprenticeship as a mining engineer at the Hetton Collieries, of which his father was then manager, he received his first appointment in 1858 as viewer at North Hetton Colliery, becoming shortly afterwards assistant manager to his father, and then viewer, at the Hetton Collieries. On his father's death in 1866 he became managing director of the Hetton Collieries, and continued to occupy this position down to the sale of the undertaking to Lord Joicey's firm in 1911. Sir Lindsay Wood was also managing partner of the North Hetton Coal Company and managing director of the Harton Coal Company, and was on the board of John Bowes and Partners, the Netherton Coal Company, the Newcastle Electric Supply Company, the Durham Collieries Electric Supply Company, the Hendon Paper Works, and the north-Eastern Railway Company. He was also mining engineer to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners and to the Greenwich Hospital. He rendered useful service on various Royal Commissions, among them that on Accidents in Mines, 1870-86, and that on Coal Supplies, 1903-05. He was president of the Northern Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers from 1875 to 1878. As chairman of the Durham Coalowners' Association, he won the confidence of the miners' leaders as well as of the coalowners. He was also chairman of the North of England United Coal Trade Association and of the Durham Colliery Owners' Mutual Protection Association. Before the passing of the Education Act of 1870 he had himself provided an efficient system of elementary schools in the neighbourhood of his own collieries, and his consideration for the well-being of those dependent on him showed itself in countless ways.

He was an active supporter of the Unionist cause, president of the party organisation in the Houghton-le-Spring Division, and chairman of the Durham County Division of the National Union of Conservative and Constitutional Associations. He was a Justice of the Pease and a Deputy-Lieutenant, and was Sheriff in 1889. He was created a baronet in 1897.

Sir Lindsay Wood married in 1873, Emma, fourth daughter of the late Captain Samuel G. Barrett, of Heighington Hall, near Darlington. She died in 1891, leaving four sons and two daughters. The eldest, who succeeds to the baronetcy, is Mr. Arthur Nicholas Lindsay Wood, born in 1875. Mr. Wood is a mining engineer, and was formerly a captain on the Northumberland (Territorial) Artillery.


1875-1878 Sir Lindsay Wood, Bart.

Lindsay Wood was born at Killingworth Hall in 1834. He was the son of the first President of the Institute.

Nicholas Wood


Wood was educated at the Royal Kepier Grammar School (Houghton-le-Spring) and King's College (London). He served an apprenticeship as a mining engineer at the Hetton Colleries where his father was manager. After his father's death in 1866, Wood became managing director of the Hetton Collieries. He was also managing partner of the North Hetton Coal Company and managing director of the Harton Coal Company.


Wood was elected as a member of North of England Mining Institute and Mechanical Engineers on the 1st of October 1857. He became President between 1875-1878 and again in 1902-03. For over 40 years he was also president of the Durham Coalowners' Association, meaning he won the confidence of the miners' leaders as well as the coalowners. Wood was also chairman of the North of England United Coal Trade Association and of the Durham Colliery Owners' Mutual Protection Association.


Wood was an active supporter of the Unionist cause, acting as President of the party organisation in the Houghton-le-Spring Division, and Chairman of the Durham County Division of the National Union of Conservative and Constitutional Associations. He was a Justice of the Peace and a Deputy-Lieutenant (becoming Sheriff in 1889). He was created a baronet in 1897.

 

Sir Lindsay Wood married in 1873 and had four sons and two daughters. His eldest son Arthur succeeded to the baronetcy.

The Hermitage

A  Postcard of The Hermitage

                    The Hermitage Staff


Hilda     TURNER  Governess
Fred      HUTTON  Servant Butler

John      GRIFFITH  Servant Footman

Edward C. JONES    Servant  Footman

Annie    LIDDELL  Servant  Nurse

Emily    COULD   Servant  Lady's Maid
Mary A. ANDREWS  Servant  Housekeeper
Mary A. HALL  Servant   Kitchen Maid

Sarah     BRUCE   Servant   Kitchen Maid

Sarah     ROBINSON  Servant   Kitchen Maid

Martha AUSTIN   Servant   Housemaid

Louise   AUSTIN  Servant   Housemaid

Louise    MILINER  Servant   Nurse

Annie    CORAM  Visitor    Nurse

Beatrice WRIGHT  Visitor    Nurse

Newton T1NDALE  Head   Gamekeeper

Christina TINDALE  Wife

Eleanor TINDALE  Daughter

James    TINDALE  Son

Elizabeth TINDALE  Daughter

Elspeth TINDALE  Daughter

John      ALLISON  Head    Coachman

Isabella M. ALLISON  Wife

George  PATT1SON  Visitor    Groom

George CARVER  Visitor     Groom

Marcus THOMPSON  Head   Domestic Gardener

Dorothy THOMPSON  Daughter Dressmaker

Anne     THOMPSON  Daughter Draper's Asst.

Marcus THOMPSON  Son   Scholar

Robert   CLARK   Servant   Gardener

James    HARLAND  Servant   Gardener

John      DEIGHTON  Servant   Gardener

Dorothy WOOD   Head       Laundress

Mary C WOOD   Daughter  Laundress

Sarah   WOOD   Daughter Laundress